The 20 | NBC Philadelphia
  • Is Banning Large Sugary Drinks a Good Idea? Say goodbye to the super-sized Slurpee and Trenta beverage from Starbucks? As reported in Thursday’s New York Times, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is proposing a ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks in the city’s restaurants, delis and movie theaters in the hopes of combating obesity. The proposal - expected to be announced formally on Thursday - would take 20-ounce soda bottles off the shelves of the city’s delis and eliminate super-sized sugary soft drinks from fast-food menus. 
City Hall officials, citing a 2006 study, argue that sugary drinks are the largest driver of rising calorie consumption and obesity. They note that sweet drinks are linked to long-term weight gain and increased rates of diabetes and heart disease.
The administration’s proposal would impose a 16-ounce limit on the size of sugary drinks sold at food service establishments, including restaurants, movie theaters, sports venues and street carts. It would apply to bottled drinks as well as fountain sodas. The ban would apply only to drinks that contain more than 25 calories per 8 ounces.
Further, the measure would not apply to diet sodas, fruit juices, dairy-based drinks like milkshakes, or alcoholic beverages, and it would not extend to beverages sold in grocery or convenience stores.
Bloomberg has enacted measures like this in the past with smoking, salt, alcohol, and trans-fats and now he wants to ban people from buying sugary drinks in giant containers, as Forbes reports. Will people consume less as a result? Or will they just pay more to get two smaller sized sodas? And do the ban’s benefits exceed its costs?
Chime In: Is this measure a good idea?
-LD
[NYTimes, Forbes]
Photo: Getty Images

    Is Banning Large Sugary Drinks a Good Idea? Say goodbye to the super-sized Slurpee and Trenta beverage from Starbucks? As reported in Thursday’s New York Times, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is proposing a ban on the sale of large sodas and other sugary drinks in the city’s restaurants, delis and movie theaters in the hopes of combating obesity. The proposal - expected to be announced formally on Thursday - would take 20-ounce soda bottles off the shelves of the city’s delis and eliminate super-sized sugary soft drinks from fast-food menus. 

    City Hall officials, citing a 2006 study, argue that sugary drinks are the largest driver of rising calorie consumption and obesity. They note that sweet drinks are linked to long-term weight gain and increased rates of diabetes and heart disease.

    The administration’s proposal would impose a 16-ounce limit on the size of sugary drinks sold at food service establishments, including restaurants, movie theaters, sports venues and street carts. It would apply to bottled drinks as well as fountain sodas. The ban would apply only to drinks that contain more than 25 calories per 8 ounces.

    Further, the measure would not apply to diet sodas, fruit juices, dairy-based drinks like milkshakes, or alcoholic beverages, and it would not extend to beverages sold in grocery or convenience stores.

    Bloomberg has enacted measures like this in the past with smoking, salt, alcohol, and trans-fats and now he wants to ban people from buying sugary drinks in giant containers, as Forbes reports. Will people consume less as a result? Or will they just pay more to get two smaller sized sodas? And do the ban’s benefits exceed its costs?

    Chime In: Is this measure a good idea?

    -LD

    [NYTimes, Forbes]

    Photo: Getty Images

  • Sandusky Judge Allows Live-Tweeting, Live-Blogging During Trial. As pointed out by the folks at Poynter, according to the court order issued on Wednesday by the Centre County Court of Common Pleas, reporters will be allowed to live-tweet and live-blog during the trial of former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky on sexual abuse charges. They cannot, however, broadcast testimony “verbatim” or transmit photographs, the court order said.
For the preliminary hearing in December, Specially Presiding Judge John M. Cleland at first said reporters had to turn their phones off and that laptops could be used “solely for the purpose of note taking.” He later relaxed the rules to allow live-tweeting and live-blogging.
NBC10 will be live at the trial as it begins next Tuesday, June 5. Stick with NBC10.com, @NBCPhiladelphia on Twitter and NBC10 News on-air for the latest from Centre County.
-LD
Poynter, Centre County Court of Common Pleas
Photo: Getty Images

    Sandusky Judge Allows Live-Tweeting, Live-Blogging During Trial. As pointed out by the folks at Poynter, according to the court order issued on Wednesday by the Centre County Court of Common Pleas, reporters will be allowed to live-tweet and live-blog during the trial of former Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky on sexual abuse charges. They cannot, however, broadcast testimony “verbatim” or transmit photographs, the court order said.

    For the preliminary hearing in December, Specially Presiding Judge John M. Cleland at first said reporters had to turn their phones off and that laptops could be used “solely for the purpose of note taking.” He later relaxed the rules to allow live-tweeting and live-blogging.

    NBC10 will be live at the trial as it begins next Tuesday, June 5. Stick with NBC10.com, @NBCPhiladelphia on Twitter and NBC10 News on-air for the latest from Centre County.

    -LD

    Poynter, Centre County Court of Common Pleas

    Photo: Getty Images

  • Daily News Headline About Atlantic City Murders: Too Much? “Yo, Philly. Stick It.” That’s in short what the Atlantic City Press wrote in response to a Philadelphia Daily News front page calling Atlantic City a “Tourist Death Trap” after a double-murder Monday outside of the Bally’s casino. The stabbing victims were identified on Wednesday as Po Lin Wan, 80, and Alice Mei See Leung, 47, and their families notified. Antoinette Pelzer, 44, is charged with the crime. She appeared in court on Tuesday and bail was set at $1.5 million.
But the Atlantic City Press fired back at the Daily News with a column Wednesday:

"A “Tourist Death Trap”? 
Please.
In words our fellow journalists who designed Tuesday’s front page at the Philadelphia Daily News might use: Yo, Philly. Stick it.
Newspapers, of course, have an obligation to report the news, even and especially when the news is painful and distressing. And The Press of Atlantic City did not shy away from reporting this story in the newspaper and online. But our brethren at the Daily News were over the top – and irresponsible.”

The AC Press column goes on further describe how tourists are rarely a victim of crime in Atlantic City, and then takes on the Daily News further and asks readers to email Daily News editor Larry Platt with further complaints.

The Daily News, of course, is the Daily News - a tabloid known for splashy and even trashy front pages. But calling Atlantic City a “Tourist Death Trap” just as the summer tourist season is about to kick off is not only inaccurate - it’s downright mean-spirited.
Larry Platt is editor of The Daily News. People who care about Atlantic City and know the truth about the city might want to let him know how they feel. His email address is plattl@phillynews.com.

Interestingly, Daily News casino columnist Chuck Darrow seems to agree with the Press of Atlantic City. On Tuesday, he called out his own employer in a column about the cover and headline:

"Monday’s brutal and random stabbing deaths of two Canadian women in the heart of midtown are being played nationwide (if not worldwide) as just another day in Hell East. A perfect example is the Daily News’ Tuesday front page, which is dominated by the headline, “TOURIST DEATH TRAP.”
This is simply unfair. There is absolutely nothing in this tragedy that identifies it as an only-an-AyCee event. The perpetrator of the heinous crimes, a 44-year-old Philadelphia woman who reportedly suffers from mental illness, could have committed them anywhere—from New York’s Times Square, to the Las Vegas Strip to our own City Hall courtyard. That she did so at Michigan and Pacific avenues in Atlantic City was simply a function of coincidence, random chance, or, if you are so inclined to believe, the fates.”

What do you think? Was the Daily News cover and headline unfair on this story? 
-LD
[Philadelphia Daily News, Press of Atlantic City, NBC10, h/t @Romenesko]

    Daily News Headline About Atlantic City Murders: Too Much? “Yo, Philly. Stick It.” That’s in short what the Atlantic City Press wrote in response to a Philadelphia Daily News front page calling Atlantic City a “Tourist Death Trap” after a double-murder Monday outside of the Bally’s casino. The stabbing victims were identified on Wednesday as Po Lin Wan, 80, and Alice Mei See Leung, 47, and their families notified. Antoinette Pelzer, 44, is charged with the crime. She appeared in court on Tuesday and bail was set at $1.5 million.

    But the Atlantic City Press fired back at the Daily News with a column Wednesday:

    "A “Tourist Death Trap”? 

    Please.

    In words our fellow journalists who designed Tuesday’s front page at the Philadelphia Daily News might use: Yo, Philly. Stick it.

    Newspapers, of course, have an obligation to report the news, even and especially when the news is painful and distressing. And The Press of Atlantic City did not shy away from reporting this story in the newspaper and online. But our brethren at the Daily News were over the top – and irresponsible.”

    The AC Press column goes on further describe how tourists are rarely a victim of crime in Atlantic City, and then takes on the Daily News further and asks readers to email Daily News editor Larry Platt with further complaints.

    The Daily News, of course, is the Daily News - a tabloid known for splashy and even trashy front pages. But calling Atlantic City a “Tourist Death Trap” just as the summer tourist season is about to kick off is not only inaccurate - it’s downright mean-spirited.

    Larry Platt is editor of The Daily News. People who care about Atlantic City and know the truth about the city might want to let him know how they feel. His email address is plattl@phillynews.com.

    Interestingly, Daily News casino columnist Chuck Darrow seems to agree with the Press of Atlantic City. On Tuesday, he called out his own employer in a column about the cover and headline:

    "Monday’s brutal and random stabbing deaths of two Canadian women in the heart of midtown are being played nationwide (if not worldwide) as just another day in Hell East. A perfect example is the Daily News’ Tuesday front page, which is dominated by the headline, “TOURIST DEATH TRAP.”

    This is simply unfair. There is absolutely nothing in this tragedy that identifies it as an only-an-AyCee event. The perpetrator of the heinous crimes, a 44-year-old Philadelphia woman who reportedly suffers from mental illness, could have committed them anywhere—from New York’s Times Square, to the Las Vegas Strip to our own City Hall courtyard. That she did so at Michigan and Pacific avenues in Atlantic City was simply a function of coincidence, random chance, or, if you are so inclined to believe, the fates.”

    What do you think? Was the Daily News cover and headline unfair on this story? 

    -LD

    [Philadelphia Daily News, Press of Atlantic CityNBC10, h/t @Romenesko]

  • Does Every Kid Deserve a Trophy? Ask most parents why they involve their kids in youth sports, and many will tell you it is designed to get them exercise and to establish life skills including teamwork. But are we failing in teaching them that not everyone is a winner because we hand out trophies too freely? It’s an issue that has been discussed for years, and a local columnist (J.D. Mullane of PhillyBurbs) offered his take on whether every child should receive a trophy for participation in a column published Tuesday. He starts his column by saying:

"What would you think of a father who told his children that their shining sports trophies, colorful ribbons and medals awarded at the end of the season simply for showing up were undeserved? That such false honors, typical of suburban youth sports associations, should be handed to talented teammates, and not to every enthusiastic dabbler daydreaming in the outfield.
You might say such a man is a miscreant, cruelly tromping a kid’s “self-esteem,” which the trophies are intended to inflate. Let me introduce you to such a monster: me. I believe the widespread practice of awarding trophies to every kid who participates on a team, no matter their talent, should be discontinued.” 

He goes on to explain further why everyone does not deserve a reward:

"When it comes to sports, some kids are destined for greatness, but most are destined to be great fans. Giving everyone a trophy is unfair. It would be national news, probably, if an athletic association announced that it would honor only top players, because this is a lesson in fair play. Kids understand this. It should be explained that the real world neither respects nor rewards those who glom another player’s glory. The sooner this is learned, the better children are prepared to survive, thrive and pursue their own happiness in a highly competitive world."

It would appear as though the whole trophy situation in youth sports doesn’t reflect real life. Everyone doesn’t win. Trophies and awards are meant for the ones who achieve and go above and beyond, not just for showing up.
Are we failing to teach our children a valuable life lesson by handing out trophies to everyone simply for participating? Weigh in below.
-LD
h/t @JDMullane, PhillyBurbs

    Does Every Kid Deserve a Trophy? Ask most parents why they involve their kids in youth sports, and many will tell you it is designed to get them exercise and to establish life skills including teamwork. But are we failing in teaching them that not everyone is a winner because we hand out trophies too freely? It’s an issue that has been discussed for years, and a local columnist (J.D. Mullane of PhillyBurbs) offered his take on whether every child should receive a trophy for participation in a column published Tuesday. He starts his column by saying:

    "What would you think of a father who told his children that their shining sports trophies, colorful ribbons and medals awarded at the end of the season simply for showing up were undeserved? That such false honors, typical of suburban youth sports associations, should be handed to talented teammates, and not to every enthusiastic dabbler daydreaming in the outfield.

    You might say such a man is a miscreant, cruelly tromping a kid’s “self-esteem,” which the trophies are intended to inflate. Let me introduce you to such a monster: me. I believe the widespread practice of awarding trophies to every kid who participates on a team, no matter their talent, should be discontinued.” 

    He goes on to explain further why everyone does not deserve a reward:

    "When it comes to sports, some kids are destined for greatness, but most are destined to be great fans. Giving everyone a trophy is unfair. It would be national news, probably, if an athletic association announced that it would honor only top players, because this is a lesson in fair play. Kids understand this. It should be explained that the real world neither respects nor rewards those who glom another player’s glory. The sooner this is learned, the better children are prepared to survive, thrive and pursue their own happiness in a highly competitive world."

    It would appear as though the whole trophy situation in youth sports doesn’t reflect real life. Everyone doesn’t win. Trophies and awards are meant for the ones who achieve and go above and beyond, not just for showing up.

    Are we failing to teach our children a valuable life lesson by handing out trophies to everyone simply for participating? Weigh in below.

    -LD

    h/t @JDMullane, PhillyBurbs

  • Study: Philly a Top 10 Global Destination for Shopping. Philly as a shopping destination? That’s what it sounds like, at least in a study conducted by CNBC in conjunction with the editors at Tobe Report, a trend forecasting firm that analyzes the retail industry.

"To choose the world’s best cities for shopping, the analysts at Tobe compared a variety of city characteristics, as well as what the location had to offer in terms of the ultimate shopping experience."

And listed right there alongside Paris, Hong Kong, Austin (Tex.), Los Angeles, Melbourne (Aust.), London, New York, Copenhagen and Milan (Italy) is Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
More from the study:

"Tobe Report assistant editor Alyssa Ciranni says the City of Brotherly Love offers everything from high end merchandise to locally produced products. There’s also an added bonus - no sales tax on clothing and shoes. Check out: Center City is home to a mix of national retailers like Urban Outfitters, local retailers and trendy boutiques.Rittenhouse Row claims to be one of the most exclusive shopping areas in the country, with specialty shops, spas, haute couture boutiques and national retailers. There are carefully curated collections at Boyds, and innovative women’s wear at Joan Schepp. Ciranni also likes Knit Wit, which is “urban chic,” and Arcada Boutique, which sells up and coming labels.Old City is not only home to Independence Hall and the Betsy Ross House, it also has a wide array of stores. There are art galleries, hip boutiques, new-age designs stores and vintage shops. Ciranni suggests paying a visit to Sugarcube, which sells designer goods and vintage frocks.Chestnut Hill is where the “city meets the suburbs,” Ciranni said. Pedestrians can stroll along the cobbled streets and visit any number of specialty stores, antique shops, art galleries or chain stores.”

Rittenhouse Row’s annual spring festival takes place on Saturday, so you’ll have plenty of chances to get out and shop. But no mention of King of Prussia Mall?
What do you think? Is Philly a great shopping town?
-LD
CNBC, Tobe Report, Visit Philly (h/t @PhiladelphiaGov and Philly.com)
Photo: Getty Images

    Study: Philly a Top 10 Global Destination for Shopping. Philly as a shopping destination? That’s what it sounds like, at least in a study conducted by CNBC in conjunction with the editors at Tobe Report, a trend forecasting firm that analyzes the retail industry.

    "To choose the world’s best cities for shopping, the analysts at Tobe compared a variety of city characteristics, as well as what the location had to offer in terms of the ultimate shopping experience."

    And listed right there alongside Paris, Hong Kong, Austin (Tex.), Los Angeles, Melbourne (Aust.), London, New York, Copenhagen and Milan (Italy) is Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    More from the study:

    "Tobe Report assistant editor Alyssa Ciranni says the City of Brotherly Love offers everything from high end merchandise to locally produced products. There’s also an added bonus - no sales tax on clothing and shoes. Check out: Center City is home to a mix of national retailers like Urban Outfitters, local retailers and trendy boutiques.

    Rittenhouse Row claims to be one of the most exclusive shopping areas in the country, with specialty shops, spas, haute couture boutiques and national retailers. There are carefully curated collections at Boyds, and innovative women’s wear at Joan Schepp. Ciranni also likes Knit Wit, which is “urban chic,” and Arcada Boutique, which sells up and coming labels.

    Old City is not only home to Independence Hall and the Betsy Ross House, it also has a wide array of stores. There are art galleries, hip boutiques, new-age designs stores and vintage shops. Ciranni suggests paying a visit to Sugarcube, which sells designer goods and vintage frocks.

    Chestnut Hill is where the “city meets the suburbs,” Ciranni said. Pedestrians can stroll along the cobbled streets and visit any number of specialty stores, antique shops, art galleries or chain stores.”

    Rittenhouse Row’s annual spring festival takes place on Saturday, so you’ll have plenty of chances to get out and shop. But no mention of King of Prussia Mall?

    What do you think? Is Philly a great shopping town?

    -LD

    CNBC, Tobe Report, Visit Philly (h/t @PhiladelphiaGov and Philly.com)

    Photo: Getty Images

  • Why White Migration to Center City is Unlikely to Save Philadelphia. For the first time in 60 years, Philadelphia is adding white residents more quickly than it is losing them: 3,980, to be exact, as reported in Thursday’s Philadelphia Daily News. But as The20’s @pkerkstra writes Friday, that may not save the city.

"For every rowhouse Rocky who leaves, there’s a white empty-nester or young college graduate who moves in, usually to Center City or one of its bordering neighborhoods.
The white residents swelling Center City tend to be reasonably well-off and highly educated. That means they pay a lot in taxes while requiring relatively little in the way of city services, a combination that makes them a welcome addition to the poorest big city in the country.
Of course, there are some drawbacks to their increase in Philadelphia. Gentrification tensions are common along many of Center City’s bleeding edges. And one wonders what will happen to Philadelphia’s very identity - so closely linked to the city’s white ethnic neighborhoods - once the white population is dominated not by Joey and Stacey from the block, but by Jacob and Sophia from Swarthmore.”

Kerkstra also mentions urbanist Alan Ehrenhalt’s new book The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City, which covers the demographic inversion taking place in America, where central cities increasingly are where the affluent want to live, while suburbs are becoming home to poorer people and those who come to America from other parts of the world. 
In talking about Philadelphia, Ehrenhalt shows that it takes more than a few - or even a bunch of - rich white people moving downtown to save a city. At its core, Philadelphia is, as Ehrenhalt says, “a fashionable city center surrounded on two of its four sides by a periphery of seemingly endless poverty.”
More from Kerkstra:

In Ehrenhalt’s view, Philadelphia’s liabilities - namely the blight, violence, and taxes - are so extreme they will ultimately put a halt to Center City’s growth. In other words, instead of the engine that powers the redevelopment of all of Philadelphia, Center City is more likely to stay an affluent island amid mass poverty.

-LD
@pkerkstra, Philly.com, Amazon

    Why White Migration to Center City is Unlikely to Save Philadelphia. For the first time in 60 years, Philadelphia is adding white residents more quickly than it is losing them: 3,980, to be exact, as reported in Thursday’s Philadelphia Daily News. But as The20’s @pkerkstra writes Friday, that may not save the city.

    "For every rowhouse Rocky who leaves, there’s a white empty-nester or young college graduate who moves in, usually to Center City or one of its bordering neighborhoods.

    The white residents swelling Center City tend to be reasonably well-off and highly educated. That means they pay a lot in taxes while requiring relatively little in the way of city services, a combination that makes them a welcome addition to the poorest big city in the country.

    Of course, there are some drawbacks to their increase in Philadelphia. Gentrification tensions are common along many of Center City’s bleeding edges. And one wonders what will happen to Philadelphia’s very identity - so closely linked to the city’s white ethnic neighborhoods - once the white population is dominated not by Joey and Stacey from the block, but by Jacob and Sophia from Swarthmore.”

    Kerkstra also mentions urbanist Alan Ehrenhalt’s new book The Great Inversion and the Future of the American Citywhich covers the demographic inversion taking place in America, where central cities increasingly are where the affluent want to live, while suburbs are becoming home to poorer people and those who come to America from other parts of the world. 

    In talking about Philadelphia, Ehrenhalt shows that it takes more than a few - or even a bunch of - rich white people moving downtown to save a city. At its core, Philadelphia is, as Ehrenhalt says, “a fashionable city center surrounded on two of its four sides by a periphery of seemingly endless poverty.”

    More from Kerkstra:

    In Ehrenhalt’s view, Philadelphia’s liabilities - namely the blight, violence, and taxes - are so extreme they will ultimately put a halt to Center City’s growth. In other words, instead of the engine that powers the redevelopment of all of Philadelphia, Center City is more likely to stay an affluent island amid mass poverty.

    -LD

    @pkerkstra, Philly.com, Amazon

  • Did You Buy Skechers Shape-ups? You May Be Eligible For a Refund. Yes, this commercial was probably too good to be true. The Federal Trade Commission said Wednesday that Skechers agreed to pay $40 million to settle charges it misled consumers with claims that its toning sneakers would do everything from help them lose weight to make their “bottom half their better half” without ever going to a gym. So this 2010 commercial (which aired during the Super Bowl) was false.

    The announcement comes eight months after Reebok settled similar FTC charges for $25 million. Along with singling out deceptive ads, such as Super Bowl ads (like this one featuring Kim Kardashian) and Brooke Burke, the FTC said research underlying the claims was suspect.

    The Skechers sneakers didn’t just fail to live up to their purported fitness claims, the FTC says. They they may have had the opposite effect. Consumers not only “didn’t lose weight, they gained weight,” says  David Vladeck, director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection.

    Consumers who bought any of the Skechers sneakers covered by the settlement can learn more and file for a refund at ftc.gov/Skechers.

    -LD

    USA Today, Youtube

  • Half of Americans Think Facebook is a Fad: Study. Half of Americans think Facebook is a passing fad, according to the results of a new Associated Press-CNBC poll. And, in the run-up to the social network’s initial public offering of stock, half of Americans also say the social network’s expected asking price is too high.
“I don’t think 900 million people can be a passing fad. A lot of people have taken a position in Facebook, it’s a self-perpetuating situation,” Martin Sorrell, CEO at advertising bellwether WPP, told CNBC Tuesday. “The $100 billion was predictable and they’re trying to build a momentum.”
Half of the 1,000 people polled by the Associated Press and CNBC called Facebook a passing fad. A majority of those surveyed (51 percent) have a favorable impression of the company, while 23 percent have an unfavorable opinion.
For complete poll results and analysis from CNBC, click here.
What do you think? Is Facebook a fad?
-LD
AP-CNBC

    Half of Americans Think Facebook is a Fad: Study. Half of Americans think Facebook is a passing fad, according to the results of a new Associated Press-CNBC poll. And, in the run-up to the social network’s initial public offering of stock, half of Americans also say the social network’s expected asking price is too high.

    “I don’t think 900 million people can be a passing fad. A lot of people have taken a position in Facebook, it’s a self-perpetuating situation,” Martin Sorrell, CEO at advertising bellwether WPP, told CNBC Tuesday. “The $100 billion was predictable and they’re trying to build a momentum.”

    Half of the 1,000 people polled by the Associated Press and CNBC called Facebook a passing fad. A majority of those surveyed (51 percent) have a favorable impression of the company, while 23 percent have an unfavorable opinion.

    For complete poll results and analysis from CNBC, click here.

    What do you think? Is Facebook a fad?

    -LD

    AP-CNBC

  • And The Top Baby Names of 2011 Are… It’s that time of the year.The Social Security Administration released its top 1,000 baby name list for 2011 on Monday morning. And  for the thirteenth year in a row, “Jacob” tops the list for boys names. The top female name is “Sophia,” while the top trending names are Brantley (boys) and Briella (girls). A full list of the names is below.
BOYS
Jacob
Mason
William
Jayden
Noah
Michael
Ethan
Alexander
Aiden
Daniel
GIRLS
Sophia
Isabella
Emma
Olivia
Ava
Emily
Abigail
Madison
Mia
Chloe
And the top trending names are:
Brantley
Iker
Maximiliano
Zaiden
Kamden
Barrett
Archer
Declan
Atticus
Nico


GIRLS
Briella
Angelique
Aria
Mila
Elsie
Nylah
Raelynn
Brynlee
Olive
June


Weigh in: do you look at this list before picking a name? Do you want your kid to have a “popular” name?
-LD
[The Social Security Administration, h/t @TODAY]

    And The Top Baby Names of 2011 Are… It’s that time of the year.The Social Security Administration released its top 1,000 baby name list for 2011 on Monday morning. And  for the thirteenth year in a row, “Jacob” tops the list for boys names. The top female name is “Sophia,” while the top trending names are Brantley (boys) and Briella (girls). A full list of the names is below.

    BOYS

    1. Jacob
    2. Mason
    3. William
    4. Jayden
    5. Noah
    6. Michael
    7. Ethan
    8. Alexander
    9. Aiden
    10. Daniel

    GIRLS

    1. Sophia
    2. Isabella
    3. Emma
    4. Olivia
    5. Ava
    6. Emily
    7. Abigail
    8. Madison
    9. Mia
    10. Chloe
    And the top trending names are:
    1. Brantley
    2. Iker
    3. Maximiliano
    4. Zaiden
    5. Kamden
    6. Barrett
    7. Archer
    8. Declan
    9. Atticus
    10. Nico
    GIRLS
    1. Briella
    2. Angelique
    3. Aria
    4. Mila
    5. Elsie
    6. Nylah
    7. Raelynn
    8. Brynlee
    9. Olive
    10. June

    Weigh in: do you look at this list before picking a name? Do you want your kid to have a “popular” name?

    -LD

    [The Social Security Administration, h/t @TODAY]

  • TIME’s Breastfeeding Cover Causing Social Media Uproar. The social media world is abuzz Thursday over the latest TIME Magazine cover (full size here), showing a Los Angeles mother breast-feeding her 3-year-old son. The story hits newsstands on Friday (it is behind an online paywall to non-TIME subscribers), addresses the trend of “attachment parenting,” and has sparked debate on Twitter about two topics:
How old is too old to breast-feed?
Is this photo beautiful or disturbing?
TIME’s blog explains that the photographer chose this particular cover image because the accompanying article is about attachment parenting, and, he says, “I liked the idea of having the kids standing up to underline the point that this was an uncommon situation.”One of the mothers interviewed in the story, Dionna Ford of Kansas City, Mo., discovered how difficult it was to wean her son off breast milk.

"After six months, I decided I’d wait until he turned 1," she says. "But after my baby turned a year old, he was still a baby — not talking, barely walking — and I wondered why I’d stop now."

Actress Alyssa Milano, who had a baby last year, tweeted:

"@Time no! You missed the mark! You’re supposed to be making it easier for breastfeeding moms. Your cover is exploitive & extreme."

What did you think of the cover? Initial reactions?
-LD
TIME, Alyssa Milano
Photo: TIME Magazine

    TIME’s Breastfeeding Cover Causing Social Media Uproar. The social media world is abuzz Thursday over the latest TIME Magazine cover (full size here), showing a Los Angeles mother breast-feeding her 3-year-old son. The story hits newsstands on Friday (it is behind an online paywall to non-TIME subscribers), addresses the trend of “attachment parenting,” and has sparked debate on Twitter about two topics:

    1. How old is too old to breast-feed?
    2. Is this photo beautiful or disturbing?

    TIME’s blog explains that the photographer chose this particular cover image because the accompanying article is about attachment parenting, and, he says, “I liked the idea of having the kids standing up to underline the point that this was an uncommon situation.”One of the mothers interviewed in the story, Dionna Ford of Kansas City, Mo., discovered how difficult it was to wean her son off breast milk.

    "After six months, I decided I’d wait until he turned 1," she says. "But after my baby turned a year old, he was still a baby — not talking, barely walking — and I wondered why I’d stop now."

    Actress Alyssa Milano, who had a baby last year, tweeted:

    "@Time no! You missed the mark! You’re supposed to be making it easier for breastfeeding moms. Your cover is exploitive & extreme."

    What did you think of the cover? Initial reactions?

    -LD

    TIME, Alyssa Milano

    Photo: TIME Magazine

Meet The 20
Our editors select the 20 people worth following in your community right now. We identify them based on social media metrics and local news trending at this moment. Here’s who’s a part of The 20:
The 20 are identified using social media metrics and trending local news topics. Unless otherwise specified, the individuals listed are in no way affiliated with NBC Philadelphia

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